Posts Tagged ‘Lighting’
Friday, May 11th, 2012

Product Placement 4.5: Heart of Glass, 5/20, with Harry Allen, Omer Arbel, Bec Brittain, Johan Liden

Product Placement 4.5: Heart of Glass
Sunday, May 20, 1-3 pm (presentations start promptly at 1:30pm)
WANTED Design
269 11th Avenue (btwn W. 27th and W. 28th Sts.)

As we continue with our spring term of guerilla Product Placements, we evoke our love of Blondie and invite you to our latest edition, held as part of ICFF extravaganza WANTED Design. This installment explores a range of innovative glass items and will feature:

• Product and interior powerhouse Harry Allen

• Architect and Bocci creative director Omer Arbel

• Lighting designer extraordinaire Bec Brittain

• Aruliden principal and product provocateur Johan Liden

Open to all with no RSVP required, although trade guests may pre-register for free at 2012.wanteddesignnyc.com/attend

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

Paolo Crepax’s KUK Light for Leucos

In Finnish, “kuk” refers to the unique ice forms that crystallize into flowers, a common winter site on snow-clad Scandinavian fields. Crepax—an old-school Italian glass artist who learned his trade in Murano—took these bloom-like shape as inspiration for the line of wall, ceiling, and pendant lights he created for Leucos. Each fixture is created by hand from transparent crystal glass, so like snowflakes, no two are exactly alike. The chrome-plated metal structure of each also can be decentered for further customization. The wall and ceiling versions come with an anti-glare, silk-screened platinum diffuser, too, to ensure you won’t be blinded by the light.

Kuk pendants hovering like snowflakes.

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

CMMNWLTH’s Seltanica Pendant Light

As a sneak peek of next week’s Product Placement, we present Seltanica. The undulating folds inside this LED pendant are inspired by landscapes, moonscape, and the fragility of aging skin, while the lamp’s outside is smooth and cool to the touch. Shaped via “Mudbox,” a modeling software normally used to create animal membranes for animation, the Seltanica’s interiors are as much a product of technological experiment as they are of classic craft. Indeed: The piece’s Brooklyn-based designers, Zoe Coombes and David Boira, produce these innards by hand using a wet machine. As such you could say they blur they line between industrial and organic design, just as their finished object is both strangely erotic and lifelessly mechanical.

The Seltanica's undulating interior folds

The first production run, with the fixtures fresh out of the molds

Sunday, August 28th, 2011

Bau Pendant by Vibeke Schmidt

Part sculpture and part lighting fixture, the Bau takes its cue from Piet Mondrian’s visceral color palette. Yet there are no tidy rational grids here: Instead, the pendant’s interlocking circles—pieces of birch plywood painted red, blue, yellow, white, and black—sit off-center, sticking out in all directions. The result is a lamp truly organic in shape, and more like decorative topiary than a functional object. Which is how its Danish designer Vibeke Schmidt, aimed for it to be. “I want people to have to see [it] and wonder what it looks like from the other side,” she says. “It must appeal to people’s curiosity.” After making appearances at trade fairs for the past year, the fixture will finally be available in the U.S. in September from manufacturer Normann Copenhagen. It’ll come in two sizes, as well as in a natural version.

The Bau, lighting up the night

Photo: Dorte Krogh

Monday, March 29th, 2010

Roll & Hill, Jason Miller’s Contemporary Lighting Company for the U.S. Market

Miller's Modo Lights, one of the debut pieces for Roll & Hill.

Miller's Modo Lights, one of the debut pieces for Roll & Hill.

As a designer of contemporary furniture and lighting, Jason Miller has experienced the lack of opportunities for American talent firsthand. So he’s done something about it. Last week he officially unveiled the first collection for Roll & Hill, his New York City-based company that manufactures high-end contemporary lighting products for, as he puts it, the underserved U.S. market. The first batch of pieces—from such homegrown designers as Miller, Lindsay Adams Adelman, Paul Loebach, Rich Brilliant Willing, and Sara Cihat and Michael Miller—intend to appeal specifically to American consumers in their use of familiar cultural references and materials. Costing between $2,000 to $10,000, the fixtures are made on demand in Brooklyn with a lead time of two to three weeks (as opposed to the usual two to three months). And unlike most contract goods, the lights will be available to the public directly through the company’s web site, rather than through a third-party agent.

The Agnes Chandelier, by Lindsey Adams Adelman. The design is also available as a candelabra.

The Agnes Chandelier, by Lindsey Adams Adelman. The design is also available as a candelabra.

Paul Loebach's Himmeli pendant light. Chandelier and floor versions are also in the works.

Paul Loebach's Himmeli pendant light. Chandelier and floor versions are also in the works.

The Excel by Rich Brilliant Willing, available as a sconce, a table lamp, or a floor lamp (as shown here).

The Excel by Rich Brilliant Willing, available as a sconce, a table lamp, or a floor lamp (as shown here).

Miller's Superordinate Antler chandelier, which was the inspiration for forming Roll & Hill. The company has several new versions of the light, including as a sconce and in a fetching bright red.

Miller's Superordinate Antler chandelier, which was the inspiration for forming Roll & Hill. The company has several new versions of the light, including as a sconce and in a fetching bright red.

Thursday, January 7th, 2010

Ribbon Light by Eric Chan for TBT

A bevy of Ribbon lights.

A bevy of Ribbon lights.

The first domestic lamp to incorporate Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lighting technology, hitherto used to backlight flat-screen TVs, the Ribbon is a technological marvel wrapped up in an unassuming plastic package. boasts bulbs that can last for 15,000 hours—twice as long as CFLs and 15 times puny incandescents. The Ribbon’s light can be dimmed without flickering (a hazard of LEDs) and its color adjusted to any custom mixture of warm and cool. The lamp’s bendable, elbow-like arm also means its can do triple duty as a task, ambient, and night light. And all for about half the price of a comparable LED model.

Tuesday, October 13th, 2009

Fold Lamp by Ett La Benn

Fold comes in fetching neon orange or green.

Fold comes in fetching neon orange or green.

Sometimes you don’t need to reinvent the wheel. Such is the case with the Fold, a table lamp by Berlin-based duo ett la benn. Designed as background lighting for living spaces, it comprises a bent metal sheet with a colored OLED panel placed inside. OLEDs—or organic light-emitting diodes—are fantastically energy efficient and used on television screens, computer monitors, and the like, but can look cold and technical. This simple combination of color and materials humanizes the technology, showing how it can be integrated into domestic environments.
Fold in action.

Fold in action.